PhD-Educated Least Likely to Get Vaxxed: Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh study finds highest educated Americans are most vaccine-hesitant.

QUICK FACTS:
  • Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh researchers found that vaccine hesitancy is highest among those with a Ph.D.
  • The study tracked vaccine hesitancy among U.S. adults between January and May 2021.
  • Researchers surveyed more than 5 million Americans.
  • Responders were asked whether they were “probably” or “definitely not” planning on getting a gene-based Covid-19 vaccine.
  • The study showed that “by May Ph.D.’s were the most hesitant group,” reports the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC).
  • “So not only are the most educated people most sceptical of taking the Covid vaccine, they are also the least likely the change their minds about it,” Unheard comments.
WHY THE VAX IS BEING REJECTED:
  • UPMC notes the most cited reasons the most reluctant to get the non-FDA approved vaccine include “not trusting the vaccine” and “not trusting the government.”
  • But those who reject the vaccine are also concerned about “vaccine safety” as well as “potential side effects.”
GRAPH PROVIDED BY THE STUDY:
BACKGROUND:
  • The Mayo Clinic recently found that the Pfizer vaccine is only 42% effective.
  • A German chief pathologist also recently found that the Covid-19 vaccine is the cause of death in 30–40% of autopsies.
  • Ex-Pfizer VP Dr. Michael Yeadon recently reported the vaccine causes “autoimmune” disorders.
  • International Journal of Vaccine Theory, Practice, and Research published a study titled “Worse Than the Disease? Reviewing Some Possible Unintended Consequences of the mRNA Vaccines Against COVID-19” in which MIT scientists concluded that the Covid-19 vaccines can cause “blood disorders, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune diseases.”
  • The same peer-reviewed study says vaccines can cause “shedding,” whereby “transmission of the [spike] protein from a vaccinated to an unvaccinated person” can result in “symptoms induced in the latter.”

Jon Fleetwood is Managing Editor for American Faith.