Wisconsin Lawmakers Introduce Bill Removing Inactive Voters From State’s Voting System

Lawmakers introduce new legislation that would force Wisconsin to scrub voter rolls of the millions of current inactive voters in the state.

QUICK FACTS:
  • Wisconsin Senator Andre Jacque (R-DePere) and Representative Ty Bodden (R-Hilbert) have introduced legislation that would delete the approximate 3.6 to 3.8 million extra ineligible “inactive” non-registered voter names from “My Vote WI,” the state’s voting website for its residents.
  • The names of inactive voters are, for an unexplained reason, co-mingled with the 3.6 million eligible “active” voters living in the state of Wisconsin. 
  • The “inactive” place for My Vote WI allows an individual’s name to be on the voter rolls, but not on the poll books for elections due to reasons such as moving or death. 
  • By creating the bill, Jacque and Bodden hope to clean up the elections that have been compromised since 2006, when Wisconsin began to operate on a statewide voter registration database. 
WISCONSIN REP. TY BODDEN ON RESTORING FAITH IN THE ELECTION PROCESS:

“Secure our elections, eliminate any chance of election fraud and restore trust in our election process,” Bodden said.

BACKGROUND:
  • Earlier this month, Election Watch (EW), an election integrity watchdog group located in Wisconsin, found over 150,000 votes cast in the 2020 election could not be traced to an actual address.
  • EW computer analyst Peter Bernegger claimed the group discovered the discrepancies in the group’s study of Wisconsin’s voter rolls.
  • According to Bernegger, 45,000 votes involved people who lived out of the state, and another 107,000 included people who moved to a different address in Wisconsin but voted in a different jurisdiction.
  • “That’s over 150,000 votes cast in the 2020 presidential election that cannot be tied to a valid address,” Bernegger said. “That’s illegal in the state of Wisconsin.”
  • Wisconsin voters were disgruntled to learn that their vote was illegitimately counted in the election, saying “we need reform in our voting system.”
  • In November 2021, Gubernatorial candidate Rebecca Kleefisch said that urgent action was needed to boost confidence in the 2022 midterm elections and filed a lawsuit targeted at the Wisconsin Elections Commission.
  • “Our freedom, our way of life, and the future of our great nation all depend on free and fair elections — elections where every voter can trust the process and the result,” she said in a statement. “Wisconsinites are sick and tired of unelected bureaucrats intentionally ignoring the law. The lawsuit forces WEC to clean up their act prior to administering the 2022 election.”