WaPo Reports Study Proving COVID Shots Impacted Women’s Periods

Study cited 20,000 complaints from women.

QUICK FACTS:
  • The Washington Post reported on data from a new study that indicated the coronavirus vaccine was impacting women’s hormonal cycles.
  • The Washington Post article noted that women around the country posted about the negative impact the vaccine made on their health.
  • Data from the published study indicated that women got their periods an average of one day later after their first vaccine.
  • Those who received two vaccinations in the same study timeframe had “greater disruptions,” and an estimated 13 percent experienced a delay of eight days or more.
STUDY DETAILS:
  • The British Medical Journal study took its data from a popular period-tracking app called Natural Cycles, which tracked women from North America, Britain, and Europe.
  • The study was led by Alison Edelman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Oregon Health & Science University.
  • The doctor said for most the impact was temporary, as far as their study on periods indicated, and there was not any found impact on fertility.
  • “Now we can give people information about possibly what to expect with menstrual cycles,” Edelman said. “So I hope that’s overall really reassuring to individuals.”
  • There is no indication that the study actually evaluated the fertility of the women in question.
BACKGROUND:
  • Previous questions about the possible negative impact of COVID-19 vaccines have been met with derision. However, in recent months, questions have arisen, even in the mainstream media.
  • Forbs questioned the possibility of “Covid-19 Vaccine Impact The Developing Cycles Of Prepubescent Kids” in May of 2021.
  • However, around the same time, experts were maintaining that “the menstrual cycle is a really flexible” thing and any kind of stress could impact it.
  • Just months ago, TIME published an article on how COVID-19 vaccines may impact periods referencing a new survey on the topic published in the journal Science Advances