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Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Trump’s Last Remaining Election Challenge

The Supreme Court dismissed former President Donald Trump’s final remaining challenge to the 2020 presidential election results this morning, a lawsuit challenging the results in the state of Wisconsin.

Also on March 8, the high court declined to hear an emergency petition for mandamus brought by pro-Trump lawyer L. Lin Wood who on Dec. 30, 2020, asked the court to block the Jan. 5, 2021 runoff elections for Georgia’s two U.S. Senate seats. The races were won by Democrats who unseated two incumbent Republicans, handing control of that chamber to Democrats as President Joe Biden began his term of office.

The court, as is its custom when refusing to hear petitions, did not explain its actions March 8. No justices indicated they were dissenting from the dismissal orders.

In the case at hand, Trump v. Wisconsin Elections Commission, court file 20-883, Trump argued the commission violated the U.S. Constitution when it established rules for mail-in voting inconsistent with state law.

The commission and local election officials “implemented unauthorized, illegal absentee voting drop boxes, compelled illegal corrections to absentee ballot witness certificates by poll workers, and encouraged widespread voter misuse of ‘indefinitely confined’ status to avoid voter ID laws, all in disregard of the Legislature’s explicit command to ‘carefully regulate’ the absentee voting process,” Trump’s petition stated.

In the petition, Trump challenged the rules under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and Article II of the U.S. Constitution, which states that “Each State shall appoint [electors for president and vice president] in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct.”

The dismissal came after the Supreme Court threw out a series of legal challenges on Feb. 22 to voting processes and results in several states left over from the recent presidential election cycle, as The Epoch Times previously reported.

Those cases concerned the presidential elections held in the battleground states of Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.