Pelosi’s Laptop Not Stolen On Jan 6, Missing Device Just Used For PowerPoints

A correction from the Associated Press pokes a hole in the official January 6 narrative.

A correction in a story run by the Associated Press seems to reveal reveals that infamous laptop stolen from the U.S. Capitol on January 6, long rumored to belong to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, was in fact a staff laptop only used for presentations.

The correction came as part of an Associated Press story regarding a New York mother and son “charged with theft in aiding the disappearance of a laptop belonging to the staff of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.” The Associated Press erroneously describes the January 6 protests as an insurrection despite no protesters being charged with that crime.

The Associated Press originally reported that the laptop was Pelosi’s personal property. Soon after, the article was corrected to note that the laptop in fact belonged to a member of Pelosi’s staff. It is unclear if it was that staff member’s personal property, but it seems likely it was a laptop owned by Pelosi’s office, as the Associated Press notes that it “was used only for presentations.”

“This story has been updated to correct that the laptop did not belong to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi,” noted the news agency, “but was a staff laptop stolen from a conference room that was used only for presentations.” The FBI agents who arrested the mother and son, according to the Associated Press, “said they were looking for Nancy Pelosi’s laptop.”

Previously, led by a apparently false tip, the FBI raided the home of Paul and Marilyn Hueper, an Alaska couple who attended President Donald Trump’s rally in Washington, D.C. on January 6, but maintain they did not take place in the protest at the U.S. Capitol. Despite the FBI breaking down the family’s door in what they maintain was a no knock raid, they now admit the family was not responsible for taking the infamous Pelosi laptop, as National File reported.

It is now clear that the infamous Pelosi laptop that provoked this raid was, in fact, a staff laptop used for presentations that likely held no sensitive information.