NYC Shows ‘Nuclear Preparedness PSA’ Offering Tips in Case of Attack

The announcement assured New Yorkers, “You’ve got this.”

QUICK FACTS:
  • New Yorkers were encouraged to “get inside” and “stay inside” in the case of a nuclear attack on the city.
  • The advice came as part of a public service announcement created by the city of New York about a potential nuclear attack.
  • Included in the advice was the recommendation that residents “get inside” quickly to the interior of the building.
  • They were also advised to stay inside, shut windows and doors, move to the middle of the building, take off clothing, and shower with a cleansing agent.
  • New Yorkers were also told to “stay tuned,” and follow local media or sign up for notifications from officials through wireless alerts.
DETAILS FROM NYC’S OFFICIAL RECOMMENDATION:
  • New York City Emergency Management Commissioner Zach Iscol said, “New York City Emergency Management has a multitude of free resources for New Yorkers to prepare for emergencies, including no-notice events,” according to the city’s official website.
  • “As the threat landscape continues to evolve, it is important that New Yorkers know we are preparing for any imminent threats and are providing them with the resources they need to stay safe and informed,” Iscol went on to say.
  • The press release from the city’s emergency management group added that it works with several local, state, and federal agencies to organize emergency response: “In partnership with NYPD, FDNY, NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, MTA, and FEMA, the agency hosts the PlanNowNYC website, which focuses on preparing for terrorist attacks and other no-notice events, including nuclear events, as well as the steps to take if such an event occurs.”
BACKGROUND:
  • The alert appears to be in response to nuclear programs by Russia, Iran and North Korea, all of whom either have or are expected to soon have viable nuclear programs.
  • The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has reportedly had its metaphorical Doomsday Clock placed at “100 seconds to midnight” for the past two years.