Leftist Publication Slate Encourages Incest in Article Published on Eve of Valentines Day

Far-left publication Slate trying to “normalize” incest in an article about sexual attraction to family members, asking, “am I alone?

QUICK FACTS:
  • Slate magazine appeared to try to de-stigmatize sexual attraction among family members with their article, “I’m Worried My Sexual Desires Mean Something Is Very Wrong With My Brain.”
  • The article appears to be a sex advice column and begins with someone noting that their first crush was on an uncle.
  • They went on to say that they’ve been attracted to two cousins as well, though they’ve “never, ever considered acting on these desires or told anyone.”
  • In response, the columnist essentially said that humans typically only have aversions to those they are raised around, therefore family members from outside the childhood home aren’t always someone people naturally have a sexual aversion to.
  • Slate cited “evolutionary programming” when addressing the question, and went on to talk about the places where it is “legal to marry one’s, first cousin.”
  • The article was covered by conservative news site Not The Bee who said that “The message being preached here is the logical conclusion of the ‘born this way’ LGBT movement.
MORE ABOUT SLATE’S ADVICE:
  • In addition to making their reader feel better about the sexual attraction to their family members, they pointed out just how far away a cousin would have to be to avoid the risk of genetic troubles with children.
  • “While reproducing with one’s first cousin does have a somewhat elevated risk of birth defects, they’re still fairly low (according to one scholar, chance of early death and illness is between three and four percent greater than in non-cousin couples, but this risk only applies to carriers of rare disorders that are present in less than 10 percent in cousin couples),” Slate stated.
  • “It has been argued, in fact, that third or fourth cousins are a Goldilocks sort of pairing, genetically speaking: Their genes would be diverse enough to avoid the risks of first cousins but close enough to avoid genetic incompatibilities.
  • At one point the article advised it might be “Time to bust out the family tree and start making some calls!”
BACKGROUND:
  • Popular Science took a unique response to quarantine in the summer of 2021 with their article, “Go ahead, marry your cousin- it’s not that bad for your future kids.”
  • The article cited scientists at Columbia University who conducted a 7-year study of child development of a 13 million-member family tree who credited the industrial revolution and the improvement of transportation with the broader variations in the genetic makeup of couples.
  • The article also cited Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Albert Einstein, and Charles Darwin who reportedly married cousins, citing the historical opinion that these unions “weren’t considered bad or gross.”