Huxley Still Has It Right

The dystopian novel “Brave New World” was written in 1931 by visionary Aldous Huxley.

In his book, the author describes what life is like in a society that is under complete domination of a group of hardened autocrats.

It’s a tyrannical tale with a twist, however.

Members of this society are kept in a state of perpetual bliss, despite having every aspect of their lives from birth to death controlled by a power-drunk ruling class.

It’s a society in which power is concentrated in the hands of a few, communication of information is meticulously managed, and endless distractions prevent people from thinking, reasoning, or imagining.

A drug is routinely dispensed to the masses (soma), so as to facilitate the exile of perceptible sensations of pain, stress, or anxiety.

Unhappiness is avoided through excessive indulgences in materialism, sexual promiscuity, and altered states of mind.

A synthetic religion substitutes for authentic faith.

Technology is God, and as such is worshiped and adored (“Ford’s in his flivver”). Pre-conditioned slaves delight in their own enslavement.

Enduring human connections are reflexively thought of as repulsive.

The optimum relationship status is summed up in seven short words of the state maxim: “Every one belongs to every one else.”

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, recently appeared on Prager U’s “The Book Club” to discuss Huxley’s “Brave New World.”

In an engaging discussion with host Michael Knowles, the senator pointed out that slogans of the government “sound wonderful but they’re all about destroying self, destroying who you are.”