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Cancel Culture Comes for All: How 10-Year-Old Tweets Cost This Journalist Her Job

  1. In 2019, McCammond publicly acknowledged the tweets and apologized, likely hoping that the act of contrition would protect her from further reputational harm.
  2. Out of the numerous faults the woke left has, the complete lack of forgiveness for offense may be its most dangerous.
  3. The rules that cancel mobs once gleefully wielded against their foes are now being turned on them.

The rules that cancel mobs once gleefully wielded against their foes are now being turned on them.

Alexi McCammond, 27, was widely considered an up-and-coming young journalist after her time working as a political commentator for Axios news.

She had been hired as the new editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue magazine and was all set to start, before it was revealed that she had made some tweets that many considered anti-Asian and homophobic when she was 17 years old.

This wasn’t the first time the tweets had come up. In 2019, McCammond publicly acknowledged the tweets and apologized, likely hoping that the act of contrition would protect her from further reputational harm.

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Her gambit failed.

Upon hearing McCammond was going to be their new boss, angry members of the Teen Vogue staff demanded blood and called on Teen Vogue’s parent company, Condé Nast, to cut ties with her.

Initially these efforts to have McCammond fired were refused. The tweets were public knowledge when McCammond was hired, and Condé Nast seemed to believe they could weather the storm. McCammond herself apologized again, and for a moment, it almost looked like things would be fine.

Then advertisers started to pull funding.

Faced with a massive internal backlash that was now causing financial harm to the company, it was decided that McCammond and Condé Nast would have to part ways. In a statement tendering her resignation, McCammond wrote:

I became a journalist to help lift up the stories and voices of our most vulnerable communities. As a young woman of color, that’s part of the reason I was so excited to lead the Teen Vogue team in their next chapter. My past tweets have overshadowed the work I’ve done to highlight the people and issues that I care about—issues that Teen Vogue has worked tirelessly to share with the world—and so Condé Nast and I have decided to part ways.