Another Non-Violent J6 Defendant Commits Suicide After Federal ‘Parading’ Conviction

Another non-violent January 6th demonstrator charged with trumped-up misdemeanors by the Department of Justice has committed suicide while awaiting sentencing on federal charges of “parading” without a permit, a charge the DOJ wanted to throw him in federal prison over.

47-year-old Pennsylvania man Mark Aungst and his “co-defendant” Tammy Bronsburg were convicted on misdemeanor charges of “parading” in a restricted building by the DOJ after briefly entering the US Capitol building on January 6th, 2021. According to public prosecutor statements and court records, it is admitted by the DOJ that neither Aungst nor Bronsburg committed any acts of violence as part of the demonstrations, and destroyed no federal property.

“Assistant U.S. Attorney Mona Furst said the prosecution had evidence showing Aungst and Bronsburg entering the Capitol through the Senate fire door by the parliamentarian’s office approximately 2:45 p.m. and leaving 30 seconds later. Twenty minutes later they re-entered the building through the Senate wing door, and took photos and videos on their cell phones,” media has reported, citing court documents, regarding Aungst’s non-violent actions on January 6th.

Furthermore, when Capitol Police asked Aungst and Bronsburg to leave the building, they complied, returning to the bus they’d ridden to Washington on to get back home to Pennsylvania, court records show.

Despite a lack of violent and destructive actions and his apparent cooperation with police on-scene, Aungst was charged by the DOJ as a result of the massive mobilization of federal law enforcement to track down anti-election fraud demonstrators and pleaded guilty to a count of “parading” on June 27th of this year. Reportedly, he was only arrested after another demonstrator who rode on the bus with him to Washington became angry that his trip to the Capitol had delayed their return home, and reported him to the FBI. He was slated to be sentenced on September 27th and faced 6 months in prison, as well as up to a $5,000 fine.

On Wednesday, July 20th, Mark Aungst, of South Williamsport, Pennsylvania, was found dead. After an examination by the local coroner, his death was ruled a suicide, making him at least the second January 6th defendant to kill himself after facing the DOJ and having his life as he knew it largely destroyed. A skilled tradesman who worked as a gas field well service technician, he leaves behind his daughter, his mother, and three siblings.

The suicide of January 6th demonstrator Mark Aungst marks at least the second time that a non-violent Stop the Steal rally attendee has committed suicide in the wake of a federal law enforcement operation that has been highly politicized and increasingly referred to as a “witch hunt.”

Related: NBC News Admits Trump Had No Contact With Stewart Rhodes, Oath Keepers
As reported by National File, non-violent January 6th demonstrator Matthew Perna committed suicide earlier this year after pleading guilty to obstruction of Congress and three misdemeanors associated with trespassing on the Capitol grounds. When he was informed that the DOJ would pursue additional charges against him despite his existing guilty plea, Perna took his own life.

“They informed him the other day that they were pursuing additional charges. He couldn’t take another day,” prompting his suicide, his family said at the time.

As the DOJ’s cases against January 6th demonstrators have unfolded, the vast majority of those charged have pled guilty, opting not to take a chance standing trial against the full weight of the United States government.

Guy Reffitt, a January 6th defendant who never entered the Capitol building, chose to stand trial rather than accept a plea after his 18-year-old son, who has been hailed a hero by left-wing media, turned him into the authorities for attending the demonstrations. He was convicted on a number of charges and now, the DOJ wishes to add terrorism enhancements to his sentence. As a result, he faces 15 years in federal prison.