72% of Americans Think the Nation’s Moral Compass Is ‘Pointed in the Wrong Direction’

A poll released on Tuesday indicated that faith was not a crucial decider in whether Americans think the nation is morally bankrupt.

QUICK FACTS:
  • A recent survey found that 72% of Americans believe that the nation’s moral compass is “pointed in the wrong direction,” according to The Washington Examiner.
  • The publication presented a Deseret News/Marist Poll in association with Restoring America and pointed out that faith was not a critical component in the poll results.
  • The same poll found that 69% of the non-religious respondents and 74% of the Christian participants think that morality is declining in America.
  • A whopping 7 in 10 Americans believe that the nation would be better off if we prayed for one another, the study found.
MORE POLLING RESULTS:
  • The study also found that 65% of those polled don’t believe that religion is a necessary element to live a moral life.
  • However, 54% said they do believe in God “as described in the Bible.”
  • About 40% said they attend religious services once or twice a month.
  • “While the state of religion is continually changing, our study found that the majority of Americans still hold core religious beliefs and draw moral guidance from their families and their faith traditions,” said Hal Boyd, executive editor of Deseret National. “Despite headlines that emphasize religion’s decline, faith remains a strong moral force in American life.”
BACKGROUND:
  • “Family” was ranked as the most influential force for moral guidance, with 79% of those polled saying they think it has the biggest impact.
  • And more people think that the rule of law offers moral guidance (66%) than those who think that religious teaching (63%) and religious leaders (57%) offer moral guidance.
  • Only 16% look to political leaders for moral advice.