400 Republicans Call For Same-Sex Marriage Protection

The letter requested the Senate codify the so-called Respect for Marriage Act.

QUICK FACTS:
  • Over 400 current and former Republican politicians have signed on to a letter requesting that Congress put protections in place for same-sex marriage.
  • The letter was a precursor to a Senate vote slated to take place before the end of the month on the Respect for Marriage Act that would codify same-sex marriage rights.
  • Spearheading the effort was former Republican National Committee chairman and President Bush reelection campaign manager Ken Mehlman who has recently come “out” as homosexual.
  • A new nonprofit called Centerline Action was born out of Mehlman’s actions which have been promoted as a way to remove “uncertainty” from the lives of the LGBTQ community.
CONTENTS OF THE LETTER:
  • “As Republicans and conservatives, we believe strong families and lasting relationships strengthen communities, and civil marriage is a fundamental freedom central to individual liberty and the pursuit of happiness. We stand with the 71 percent of Americans today, including a majority of registered Republicans, who support the freedom to marry for all Americans,” the letter stated.
  • “Together, we call on the U.S. Senate to pass the Respect for Marriage Act and reaffirm that marriage for gay and lesbian couples is settled law. Passing the Respect for Marriage Act will remove any uncertainty for the more than one million Americans who are building families, taking on the responsibilities and commitment associated with marriage, and caring for the one they love,” the letter went on to say.
  • The letter went on, saying, “Simply put, the Respect for Marriage Act treats all American families as each of us would want to be treated. 
BACKGROUND:
  • The Respect for Marriage push among Republicans came on the heels of Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) promising to put the measure to a vote before the midterm elections in November.
  • The Respect for Marriage Act has already passed the lower chamber of Congress with the House of Representatives voting 267-157 last month, with 47 Republicans voting in favor of the bill.