Gov. Newsom Signs Bill Allowing Illegal Immigrants to Receive California IDs

Democrat Gavin Newsom signed a bill last week making it possible for illegals to obtain a California ID.

QUICK FACTS:
  • Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom has passed a new bill into law allowing immigrants coming into the country illegally to receive a California ID.
  • The new bill, AB 1766, requires that the DMV must “issue a restricted identification card to an eligible applicant who is unable to submit satisfactory proof that their presence in the United States is authorized under federal law if they provide satisfactory proof of identity and California residency, as specified.”
  • The law also prohibits law enforcement from accessing noncriminal background information for the purpose of immigration enforcement, The Gateway Pundit reported.
DEMOCRAT GAVIN NEWSOM ON PROVIDING CALIFORNIA IDS TO ILLEGALS:

“California is expanding opportunity for everyone, regardless of immigration status… We’re a state of refuge – a majority-minority state, where 27 percent of us are immigrants,” Newsom said. “That’s why I’m proud to announce the signing of today’s bills to further support our immigrant community.”

BACKGROUND:
  • Nearly 3 million illegal aliens without proper documentation are living in California as of 2019, according to the Migration Policy Institute.
  • In June 2022, Newsom introduced a program ensuring free healthcare for approximately 700,000 illegals in the state of California.
  • California’s Legislative Analyst’s Office estimated the expansion of Medi-Cal will cost taxpayers $2.6 billion annually, American Faith reported at the time.
  • In addition to AB 1766, AB 1232 has also been passed in the state of California – giving immigrant students more access to in-state tuition at public universities and additional ESL courses at community colleges.
  • Despite recent rumors, Newsom said he will not be running for president in 2024. “I was almost recalled last year. They went after me hard. That’s sobering, and that wakes you up. How vulnerable, how fast this is, how people come and go, and you know, people cut you off,” the governor said in a recent interview.